Cold War – The Korean Air Lines 007 Soviet Air Space Incident


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Cold War - The Korean Air Lines 007 Soviet Air Space Incident



September 1st, 1983, was a tense day for the Soviet regime. A military experiment was about to begin in USSR territory. The army was conducting ground, air, and sea operations to ensure its total secrecy.

Everything seemed on track along the Soviet border when a mysterious foreign aircraft was spotted near Sakhalin Island, north of Japan.

After futile attempts to establish contact with the unknown aircraft, Maj, Gennadiy Osipovich, aboard his SU-15 fighter, was assigned to take it down.

Recent reports of US recon planes scouting the zone put the USSR under alarm. It was not about to allow the secret military project to be compromised.

When Major. Gennadiy Osipovich approached the unidentified aircraft to fire warning shots, no response came from the plane.

Instead, it suddenly began to climb, slowing its speed, as if it wanted to avoid contact and flee.

After a moment of hesitation, fearing that the enemy airplane would escape with valuable intel, Maj. Osipovich was given permission to open fire and take it down no matter the cost.

With an audacious maneuver, he fired two AA-3 air-to-air missiles. One of them exploded behind the target, damaging a crucial control line. The second one hit the aircraft in the fuselage.

Maj. Osipovich radioed Command that the enemy recon plane was destroyed, and he safely returned to base. The sky was clear, and the USSR’s secrets were safe.

But to Major. Osipovich’s disgrace, neither he nor the Russian Command knew that they had just taken down a civilian aircraft carrying more than 250 innocent people inside.

The consequences of this action would put the world on the brink of nuclear war once again.

The Russians would claim it was a set-up and a deliberate political provocation, while the US would condemn it as a cruel act of barbarism.

Intelligence gathered later demonstrated more to the story than a simple unidentified aircraft flying across Russian territory…

The Korean Air Lines Flight 007 Incident would be considered one of the final denouements of Cold War fear before the USSR finally crumbled in 1991…

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45 Comments

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  1. Im wondering why pilots inten.killed all pasengers?? Didnt they know were they at? Was it hard to reply to soviet pilot calls? And dont they they were not warned before taking down!

  2. Still one doubt is not clear. Why didn't the Soviets look out for the Transponder Squawk code. We all know every civilian airplane is bound to carry a transponder and the transponder code could have helped them to identify that it's a 747 and not Boeing RC-135. They could've simply asked the pilot on an emergency frequency to switch his squawk. It's a known thing that Transponder comes with an IDENT mode for identification. Now I am just a flight simulator guy and not a real pilot . Any real pilot here who can answer my question.

  3. War is brutal huh? There's rules, but they're flexible once you're behind the trigger or the command microphone.

  4. The Russians really seem to love shooting down civilian aircraft, since the civilian aircraft can't shoot back. From as far back as WWII, all the way to as recent as 2014, Russia doesn't care about killing innocent civilians, as Russia will always deny any wrong-doing, but secretly they reward their pilots for getting those kills… such an evil empire.
    If they can't control the world, they settle for murdering as many people as possible.

  5. How smoothly you get it , if the Russians shoot down a plane, it's terrible, if the Americans, it's a disaster and a ridiculous accident. If the Russians do something, it's bad, and if the Americans do something, it's state security.

  6. Flight KAL 007 was not the first Korean Air flight that Soviets did shot down. Korean Air Lines Flight 902 (KAL 902) was a Korean Air Lines flight from Paris to Seoul via Anchorage. On April 1978, the Soviet air defense shot down the aircraft serving the flight, a Boeing 707, near Murmansk, Soviet Union

  7. There would be no reason at all for 007 to not respond to odvious aggression! Why do I have the feeling that they never tried to contact the plane and just shot it down!!

  8. This is the first time I've heard about this ! That's insane ! Reagan saying something about the Boeing 747 being a very distinctive plane I have to admit , I agree . They seriously just shot that passenger airline down like it was a UFO . I can't believe I never heard of this !

  9. This is extremely tragic. I could not imagine being the pilots finding out what you had done. I feel like being more precautious on the soviets side would’ve avoided this. But tensions were high and I’d imagine if the roles were reversed it wouldn’t have ended any differently

  10. I was a Tae Kwon Do student of Master Billy Hong who was on the plane. I did not know of his death until days later. It ended my martial arts training. I still remember his positive encouragement that he offered me. He made me feel like I had talent to be great. I was a former high school athlete but Tae Kwon Do gave me the best physical and mental place that I had ever been. I still wonder what my life would have been like if KAL 007 made in safely to its destination. But God is so good because later He did something far greater than great physical and mental abilities, He saved me from my sin thru Jesus Christ and gave me eternal life. Read John 14:6. For it is appointed for man to die once and after that comes the judgement (Hebrews 9:27). Are you prepared to meet God? I settled out of court with Jesus! We never know when we are going to die so get right with God today by repenting and trusting in Jesus (like you would with a parachute)!

  11. Time was running out for everyone,
    Flying over the Sea of Japan.
    None would live to see the rising sun,
    Death was following close at hand.

    The Russians have shot down a plane on its way to Korea.
    Two hundred and sixty nine innocent victims have died.

    Murder in the skies came without a warning.
    Murder in the skies, black September morning.
    Murder in the skies came without a warning.
    Murder in the skies, black September morning.

  12. They definitely could've waited a bit longer before they shot it down. This just shows the top brass seed soldiers and civilians alike, only as "casualties of war." They don't have to go home and think about their buddies who were just killed or the people they just killed.

    Soviets – The U.S. can now use telepathy to make people do what they want, like shoot a plane down. As they saying goes, "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink." It wouldn't be the Soviet Union if they didn't blame the U.S. for everything right?

  13. I crewed the rivet joint for years.. it's always "in the area". Also, if it's a missile launch, the "Cobra Ball" would've been there not an RJ. Its Another variant of the Rivet Joint made to film missile launches. But there's no mistaking a 747 for a 707. The fact the flight was 007, and the shit surrounding it seems awfully fishy.

  14. Laundering the Criminal Act?
    The Korean 747 was flying with lights in most of its portholes.
    Clearly, a Civilian airplane — the unmistakable profile of a Civilian 747.
    A trigger-happy Regime, busy killing their own people — namely in EAST-BERLIN.
    THEY WERE, INDEED, A SOCIAL-FASCIST REGIME.

    After the KURSK explosian, the Russian Navy TRIED TO PIN THE BLAIM OF THE TRAGEDY ON a NATO Submarine.
    IN Sum, shifting the responsability to the Countries that, in a timely manner, might have attempted to rescue the survivors.,
    The Problem with Regimes of that kind is the rigid and cold way they deal with human livres.

  15. This was no "I flew off course mistake". Think about it, a routine flight for years and years and the night the soviets were testing a new missile, this plane "accidentally" flew off course…no…doesn't happen like that…it was a C.I.A. dark ops.

  16. I remember the pilot who shot it down said he saw the lit passenger windows on the plane & the US surveillance planes didn't have those. However he was given an order.

  17. This documentary video sucks. The USSR army was innocent for the downing of the passenger plane, as the US regime and the South Korean crew were guilty of taking passengers as human shields to cover up a vulgar espionage work in Soviet air space and over its territory.

  18. I am convinced that the American actions with their RC-135 that night, have contributed to to this drama. Those American actions made the Soviets angry and irritated. So it is no miracle that they scrambled some jet fighters that night.
    The only mistake the Soviet pilots made, was not to explain to their commanders that they assumed that the Korean aircraft was a passenger plane, not a spy plane.
    But i doubt that it would had make a difference to the commanders.
    At the same time, i am amazed that the Korean pilots did not had any suspicion that they were flying in and out Soviet Airspace!!
    Anyway, it is was a huge mistake from both the Korean pilots, the American RC-135, and the Russian pilots.