How The Ring KILLED An Entire Horror Subgenre


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How The Ring KILLED An Entire Horror Subgenre



Leading into the 2000’s, Horror movies had started to fall off the cultural zeitgeist. The road was ending for 80’s slasher villains like Michael Myers (Halloween), Jason Voorhees (Friday the 13th), and Freddy Kruger (Nightmare on Elm Street), as well as the 90’s teenage horror genre. In 2002, The Ring took audiences by storm. The Ring completely changed the landscape for what American audiences were expecting. Movies like The Ring were beginning a new wave of remakes of original Asian Horror ideas and making them for audiences in the US.

#TheRing #HorrorMovies #Nerdstalgic

Written by Dave Baker
Edited by Brian Nappi

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37 Comments

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  1. I hate the blue color filter. So many movies had it, and it drove me nuts. I didn't like the 90's teen horror either, but I hated this era too.
    Underground horror is where the quality is now and really since then.

  2. Ari Aster? Robert Eggers? Jennifer Kent? Jordan Peele?
    I feel like the 2010s was somewhat of a modern golden-era, or at least a strong decade for horror.
    Thoughts on these directors and their films?

  3. I think that Ari Aster is where we go from here. Kinda surprised you spoke in a way that acted like Hereditary and Midsommar hasn’t already shaken up the horror sphere in the last few years. Oh! And Jordan Peele. Get Out, and Us, are in the same vein as Aster’s work and I think it’s what audiences are after.

  4. The Ring didn't really killed the teen slasher genre. Teen Slashers just evolved into "Slasher Remakes/ Reboots" Or are adapted into "TV Series" and they're very much STILL alive to this day.

    Unlike The Ring franchise where The Ring Two is unfairly hated by critics and audiences. Rings (Their last attempt at reviving the series after 11 years) failed both commercially & critically. I love the Ring but it really is just a one hit wonder.

    And this is coming from someone who genuinely loves the franchise and have seen Ringu, Rasen: Spiral, Ringu 2, Ringu 0: Birthday, The Ring, The Ring Two, Sadako 3D, Sadako 3D 2, Sadako vs. Kayako, Rings and Sadako 2019.

  5. The Ring is a watered down version of the original. The blue tint is tiresome. The acting is stale and it focused on the tired trope of a parent trying to save their child from some kind of malevolent entity. Instead of focusing more on how technology has become engrained in our day to day lives, to the point of becoming isolating, like the original version does.
    At the end of the day, it just another example of style over substance.

  6. I finally saw The Ring around this Halloween with friends. As much as this says it's a return to a dirtier more literally frightening horror, as a reluctant late-comer to horror, I apreciate the reative lack of jump scares and reliance on atmosphere and story. I think that's the important thing here. I feel like if I saw any of the slasher flicks you talk about I'd end up traumatized over the gore and in knots over the jump scares, but having no deeper questions of evil or styalistic stuff to discuss. The characters also tend to be purposely vapid in films about serial killers knocking off teens, so you play more or a detached detective game–that tends to make horror the dumber, bloodier cousin of detective movies. Good detective horror can be made – that's even somewhat what The Ring is, but that moodier vibe and magical element is much more an animal from the old gothic and mythological horror.

  7. You're still looking for something different that's not a remake, and the Babadook is literally standing right there?!

    All jokes aside though the Ring is still a great movie even today. It holds up well. It's patient, not afraid of calm, it has a lot of pieces that fit together when you think about them, and it's scary with very little gore which describes a lot of the best horror movies

  8. "Okay here's my plan, I'm going to make a spooky movie full of jump-scares and gore that's half supernatural horror and half memories of family abuse, and I'm going to justify everything because the main female lead underwent trauma and that justifies all her behavior" – every modern horror movie