The Insane Engineering of the Concorde


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The Insane Engineering of the Concorde



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40 Comments

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  1. HARD TO LISTEN TO.. !!@#$% QYN computer generated singular words, although pronunciation quite good. i.e. punctuation problem. I hope evolution solves this shortcoming soon. 06APR2022

  2. Delays and cost overruns increased the programme cost to £1.5-2.1 billion in 1976, (£9.44 billion-13.2 billion in 2020). All paid for by the British and French working class for the benefit of wealthy travellers. A pipe dream of both left and right-wing governments, drunk on national ambition, who never thought through the consequences of noise, range, limited capacity and fuel consumption. Anything with similar performance in the future will use antigravity technology and parabolic trajectories.

  3. ONE OF THE US APOLLO ASTRONAUTS, SAID THAT THE CONCORDE PROJECT, WAS A FAR GREATER TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT, THAN THE MOON SHOT. Concorde had to earn the covetted Flight safety Documents, for Carrying one hundred people , 3000+ miles, on the edge of SPACE, at 2.2 Mach speed, in luxuriousl comfort, without space suits or Oxygen masks .

  4. I had a moment of sadness in the London Science Museum when I walked past a Concordé engine and realise that children will never get the rush of running to the window to see Concordé fly.

  5. The Concorde didn't just fly at the speed of sound. It flew at twice the speed of sound, for the entirety of its range, over the Atlantic. No military aircraft could keep up, except for the SR-71. As a consequence, there are almost no pictures of the Concorde at altitude in level flight. There are one or two, though, made from RAF fighter jets that were able to catch up and stay with it for a minute or two, with afterburners.

  6. Looks like you are explaining the porpoise phenomenon better (in F1 cars today) at 7:11 in more detail then the dedicated F1 channels themselves. Might be a good one if you make a dedicated video about the ground effect in modern F1 cars! You seem to understand and explain physics in engineering a lot better so please give it a go!

    PS. You seem to have hit the same aviation "interest" as Wendover productions had some time ago, where you commented on one of his videos 😉

  7. Comparing the Mach 2 Concorde with the Mach 3.1 A12 / SR71 is childish. Reaching and sustaining Mach 3.1 requires money, materials, technology, engineering and effort that are all orders of magnitude beyond what went into the French-British airliner.

  8. The picture of the British Airways aircraft (G-YMMM) @16:03 was the result of fuel icing on BA flight-38, which caused the engines to fail on approach to Heathrow and the pilot had to crash-land just short of the runway. It has absolutely nothing to do with a tail strike, so why it is shown as such an example escapes me.

  9. As a mechanical engineer, watching real engineering videos always inspires me…. It helps me gain more insight about a particular topic and the methods they use is easy to understand.

  10. What an amazing plane. I remember a visit it made to South Africa back in the 70's/80's. I used to see it at airshows, especially Southend air show. A great documentary.

  11. Excellent BUT massive fail for an engineering channel at 3:45 “afterburners work by injecting fuel directly into the super heated, HIGH PRESSURE [my emphasis] exhaust”

    This is like getting the First Law of Thermodynamics wrong, a fundamental error.

    Jet engines bring in air and COMPRESS it highly in the first (compressor) stages. After combustion, the high pressure is turned into high VELOCITY. A properly tuned jet exhaust is 1:1 at ambient pressure.

    High pressure in the front is why the exhaust goes out the back and not the front!

  12. There is a concorde in The Aerospace Museum in Bristol, Filton. Close to where it was developed. Marvellous piece to look at and what a history